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20130124
20130201
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
is what the environment was about, was led by teddy roosevelt. it was embraced by men like russell train, great republicans. it was a terrific republican sense of leadership. nelson rockefeller. >> how about richard nixon? >> richard nixon. the clean air act. the man who took the lead out of the air. richard m. nixon. the man who saved the waters of this country, richard m. nixon. the last great liberal president this country had. i just would like to see this rise above this petty, partisan bickering that i heard somewhere in this panel. >> this is all part of the speech, laid out, the thing that we at least have to do with. the things the government has to be involved in. the air, the water goes from state to state, city to city. one place cannot do it. it has to be -- the regulation of how to deal with protecting all of that has to be the business of the federal government. >> can i get half a minute of rebuttal here? cap and trade work well for acid rain. acid rain stays in our country. i am not against regulated carbon. if you can get china and india to do something. if they don't,
developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> our second story "outfront", a dire warning. this from britain's chief medical officer. the threat from drug-resistant bacteria is so serious that it could trigger a national emergency, similar to a terrorist attack. some pretty stunning words and it sure caught my attention, and "outfront" tonight, we're lucky to have dr. oz, host of "the dr. oz show." i've always wondered, people who go to the doctor every time they get sick and get antibiotics, are they causing a problem? are we going to have all these things be resistant to antibiotics? is she exaggerating? >> she's not exaggerating. i'm very concerned about this. the real question is what can we do about it? the reality is, we can't keep up with the bacteria. they're going to change much more rapidly than we develop new medications at the current pace, as we ta
. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> time for the ridiculous. tonight we're adding goats. yeah, that's what i said, goats. all of them. goats in general, and a few goats in particular like the one that stole the show from a reporter in florida who was just trying to do her job and report on a county fair. >> the judging is complete. come on out and meet the winners. the goats will be here through saturday. and they're very friendly. linda carson, abc 7 -- would you not eat my pants? ah! i'm fine. >> are you okay, dear? >> oh, yes. not again. >> we can never get enough. >> did you get it? >> thankfully, wwsb reporter linda carson was not hurt. and she's a great sport about it. she took the whole thing in stride and laughed about it. i hope she doesn't mind when i say, let's roll that one again,
from unstable environments, there are consequences. extremism takes root, our interests suffer, our security at home is threatened. >> i thought that was such -- that's hillary clinton testifying this week and i thought that line was so important because it kind of disstills down i think the operational theory in intervention here or american leadership, which is when america is absent, especially from unstable environments, there are consequences. extremism takes root, our interests suffer, security at home is threatened. horace, that seems like a proposition you don't agree with and libya was a failed implementation of that view. >> first of all, hillary clinton has a very short memory, so the kind of leadership she's talking about, we have to be very clear, what kind of leadership we want in africa. the people in africa want peace. they want unity and they want reconstruction. they do not want wars. and what happened in libya is a sign of the kind of militarism we've seen all over africa from the u.s. africa command. 50,000 libyans have been killed out of this intervention. the w
to a changing political environment." >> first of all, on that comment, it is deeply offensive. democrats did the same thing in 2008. i believe andrew cuomo may have said the same thing in 2008, and he was -- >> got a pass. >> yeah. he was not hammered as much. >> he got hammered for that? i read that someone got a pass for it. >> some have gotten a pass. anyway, i think cuomo got hammered pretty hard. but this is -- i saw, richard haass, mr. i'm not going to speculate on anything that's not in front of my nose, you know, this is important. this is an important story because the guy who has been the de facto leader of the republican party over the past four years since george w. bush left town is roger els. he's run the party, he's run the conservative movement. when roger els decides she's not worth the trouble, then that means that conservatism's moving in a new direction. i talked about what happened this weekend at "the national review" institute's talk. i was really surprised. really surprised by what i heard. and heartened, whether it was bill kristol or john hatoritz. also scott walker
who are mobile and work and a global environment and a large market. it is for the non college-bound people who used to go into factory jobs, blue-collar jobs that have been disappearing because of global labor competition. this brings back something on both sides. >> i talked to young people lot. mentoring them was real important. our industry changed a lot. it used to be joe roughneck out there on the raid. -- rig. today it is so highly technical. we see so many people out there. use the computers up on our raised floor. -- use the computers up on our -- you see computers up on our rig floor. there are guys following what we are doing, making real time decisions. it is a different world today than it was before. an incredibly dirty business. -- nerdy business. it has become that. >> we had an odd editorial meeting about two years ago in which someone came in and was talking to us about the need for investments in wind power and also in mandating the use of gas. multiple choice question for you. is he a fool, or a villain? [laughter] >> i think he learned a lesson or two with
question and they always say it's about packaging and the environment changes and then they move up and the other guys move down. >> you mentioned messaging and policy, and what you did not mention was mess efrenger and i generally the pieces that are front and center. >> i asked a question earlier that i just basically ripped off from you so you would be proud. >> thanks. >> chairman rinse priebus just reelected every two years, here what he said about the republican renewal. >> we must compete in every state in every region, building relationships with communities we haven't before. at the rnc, we are dropping the red and blue state analysis. we must be a party concerned about every american in every neighborhood. >> the rhetoric, we've heard a lot of from different members of the gop, but here's my question, molly. how did priebus get another two years after such a bad year for republicans? >> there is a strong feeling among republicans that whatever happened in november was not reince priebus' fault, it was not the rnc's fault. a lot of it is blamed on the romney campaign which
and we must leave a healthy environment and clean energy sources to our children and grandchildren. the missing piece is congress. congress is sleep walking through history. it is time to wake up. the national oceanic and atmospheric administration has confirmed that 2012 was the hottest year in the contiguous united states on record ever. and this one wasn't a close call. it did not come down to the wire. 2012 was a full degree fahrenheit higher than the previous record year. a full degree fahrenheit higher than the previous record year. put that in context because one degree may not sound like a lot. but when you average it across an ire year, it is a huge shift. the previous warmest u.s. year on record -- 1998 -- was 4.2 degrees fahrenheit warmer than the coldest year on record, 1917. take the warmest year on record, is th1998 -- until now -- and yu take the coldest year -- 1917 -- and the span is only 4.2 degrees fahrenheit. so a 2.1 jump fahrenheit over 2011 is a seriously big change. but we're just starting to heat up. the most optimistic estimate for the end of the century i
certainly aware of the increasing threat environment. i not only was briefed on that, i testified to that effect. and there were constant evaluations going on. but no one, not the ambassador, security professionals, the intelligence community ever recommended closing that mission. and the reason they didn't was because the ongoing threat environment had up until the spring before our terrible attack in benghazi been a result of post-conflict conditions. that is something that we're familiar with all over the world. yes, there were some attacks, as you have said, but our evaluation of them and the recommendation by the security professionals was that those were all manageable because we had a lot of that around the world. i mean, there is a long list of attacks that have been foiled, assassination plots that have been prevented. so this is not some -- you know, one off event. this is considered in an atmosphere of a lot of threats and dangers. and at the end of the day, you know, there was a decision made that this would be evaluated but it would not be closed and, unfortunately, w
sporting event environment. it's held every two years in lee own, france, and is named for the famed french chefl paul bow kus. each competitor from each country has 5 1/2 hours to present one meat dish and one fresh fish from scratch. >> it's food that even foodies might find a little frue-frue. it's over the top. >> over the top is really the way to put it. you're really try dog food that will wow the spectator, wow the chefs visually, technically, and also whenever it hits their mouth. >> reporter: the europeans dominate the competition. the best an american has ever done is come in sixth. richard and corey are expected to change that. this $150,000 kitchen in the bunker at the greenbriar is the exact replica of the one they will use in france. >> we actually took chalk and chalked out on the floor basically exactly where everything was going to be. >> they've piped in actual crowd noise from past competitions. their war room complete with a countdown clock is where they plot their practice sessions and review photos of past winning platters. rosendale works out with a trainer nearly eve
part of my state are still not living in a security environment. we owe them that. at the same time, i think more and more americans are agreeing these 11 million people need to come out of the shadows and we need to give them a path to citizenship but not favoritism. >> senator mccain, you're exactly right. the polls are showing the majority of americans do support the type of proposal you and chuck schumer are putting forward. what would you say to conservative house republicans that will call anything you try to pat in t-- pass in the senat amnesty. >> i think we will and already are reaching across to our friendson the otherside talking and i think they realize the realities of the 21st century and there will be some difficulties and it's long hard path. i'm confident we will succeed. >> senator shuman, willie geist in new york, good to see you this morning. there's a piece in the "new york times" where a reporter goes to a diner in south carolina. the concern down there is people are being rewarded for illegal behavior, a, and b, being given priority over workers in america who ca
is have the person go over their memory as if it was happening again but they are in a safe environment. >> they say it looks like a video game but when you put the goggles on, it brings you to the same scenario. >> you put on the sounds, the sound of wind. >> and we can blow stuff up. >> therapy has been effective. i was never a fan of prolonged exposure and that kind of thing because it's an uncomfortable thing. >> at its core, therapy has to induce some level of anxiety so that you're processing hard memories. i'm skip, clinical psychologist at the university of california institute for creative technologies. let's go. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] introducing the all-new cadillac xts... another big night on the town, eh? ...and the return of life lived large. ♪ humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. at liberty mutual insurance, we understand. that's why our auto policies come with accident forgiveness if you qualify, where your rates won't go up due to your first accident, and new car replacement, where, if you total
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)